Over 24,000 Photos Were Compiled in Time-lapse Showing 929 Hours of Flowers Blooming

A newly-released timelapse has condensed 929 hours of blooming flowers into a casual three minutes. The video captures the moments the flower heads pop open to reveal the insides.

The film, recorded by Slovakian photographer Majo Chudý, and quite simply titled "Flowers Blooming 2," took over nine months to bring to fruition, for what you see here is not video footage, but a series of photos. Over 24,000 of them, in fact.

He placed each of the flowers in his studio, with the DIY setup comprised of black blankets and a bulb wrapped in aluminum foil. He used his Sony a7 mirrorless camera and his Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 lens to capture the pictures.

Writing about his experience, he said: 

I could not estimate in advance the blooming period of each flower, so it was very hard to set the interval between each [exposure]. I chose 1-2 minutes.

The Orchidea Dendrobium flower took the longest to bloom — a total of almost four and a half days, or 105 hours. This itself required over 2,000 photos to create. The fastest bloomed in just 7 hours, for which the shots were spaced 20 seconds apart.

Chudý even went as far as to strenuously remove tiny insects that lingered around the flowers during the shoot.

Like what you see? Catch more of Chudý’s work on his website and Instagram.

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8 Comments

Shavonne Wong's picture

Gorgeous! And man, sounds like a lot of work!

Very cool but I thought a couple of the sequences ended a little too soon.

Christian Möhrle's picture

Lovely time-lapse, the motion is super smooth!

Now that Fstoppers did post a few more time-lapse videos over the past months maybe we can get a post about this infrared timel-lapse https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8JjduIbYvv0

? :-)

Very cool. From the little I know about IR, it looks like you used a filter, rather than a converted camera. Yes? No?
Loved the music!

Christian Möhrle's picture

Thanks mate! I too only know a little about IR, that's why I ordered a modified DSLR from a specialized shop. They did sent me different IR filters (different strengths) as well as a filter to get normal pictures which go between the DSLR and the Lens, not on the front of the lens. Hope this helps, I'm sadly really bad when it comes to explaining hardware and tool haha :-)

The reason I asked is, some of the clips had bits of green which I wasn't expecting and I thought the sky was supposed to be darker/blacker. So, my question was based on expectations and not the final product which, again, was very cool.

Christian Möhrle's picture

Ahh I see, this could be due to the editing as I altered some of the colours quite a bit which may have added the greens. As for the sky: I aimed for bright exposures just to be safe later, I could have darkened them a lot more in post though!

Maxal Tamor's picture

Very well done!
I like that there is also a story in it.