'Wild Scotland' Is a Gorgeous Aerial Video Tour of the Country

I recently purchased a drone, and I've caught the aerial bug. The new perspective afforded by it has been wildly addicting. However, I'm still very much an amateur in my newfound abilities. Films like Wild Scotland, in their beauty and seamless sense of evolving wonder, give me something to aspire toward.

Filmmaker John Duncan notes that making Wild Scotland was a series of "mini adventures." The film was shot mostly on a DJI Inspire 1, while a Phantom 3 was used in more remote locations due to its increased portability. Particularly striking is the footage of Bass Rock near North Berwick, where a flock of 40,000 birds fills the air at sunrise. 

We really are entering a golden age in photography: equipment is more affordable than ever, and shots that even just a few years ago were impossible are suddenly within reach of any photographer with the requisite creativity, skill, and gumption. I've even grown to appreciate some of Cleveland's beauty through the lens of that little camera in the sky. If something can make Cleveland look that good, well, there must be just a smidgen of magic in this new age.

Be sure to give Duncan a follow on Facebook and Twitter!

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4 Comments

Swissblad --'s picture

Thanks for posting - amazing and inspiring.

Onn Henner's picture

The best use of drone EVER. not kidding, beautiful shots you've got there

Andrew Ashley's picture

Makes me want to head back to Scotland right now! Incredible!
Would love to know more of the sights that he filmed.

Daris Fox's picture

The laws in the UK are fairly strict already and there's been talk of clamping down on drone video creators because of rogue operators who don't have a licence. Thing is though unless you're in the wilds of Scotland or some areas of Yorkshire/Cumbria then technically you can't really fly a drone without permission and roads do count towards the built up area restriction.

This will give an idea of how strict it can be:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/news/11541504/Where-is-the-legal-l...