Netflix Releases 'Tales by Light' Season Three

Netflix recently released the newest season of its photography-centered TV show "Tales by Light."

"Tales by Light" is a documentary and reality show based on photographers' work around the world. The National Geographic and Canon joint venture focuses on photographers who attempt to tell a compelling story through their travels and images.

I haven't had time to watch the newest episodes just yet, but one of my favorite aspects about episodes in previous seasons is the fact that the show is not just about the photographers' photographs. "Tales by Light" breaks down each professional's workflow and dives deep into his or her motivations for traveling and clicking the shutter. Being mainly an outdoor photographer, one of my favorite past episodes is the fourth in season one. It features nature photographer Art Wolfe as he travels from places like Alaska to Uganda, chasing remarkable wildlife moments. It was like watching a behind-the-scenes episode of "Planet Earth." 

Something I'm looking forward to in season three of "Tales by Light" is the fact that it will feature only two or three photographers rather than a new photographer each episode. Also, it seems like each episode will have some sort of humanitarian angle. I think these aspects will help tell a greater story and shine a spotlight on how powerful photography can be in sharing different people's stories and connecting individuals from around the world. 

Watch the new season's trailer above to get a sneak peek of "Tales by Light" season three and start watching the full series on Netflix today. 

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10 Comments

Sean Sauer's picture

I watched the first 4 episodes of this new season and it is a good doc series BUT photography takes a huge backseat to the stories they are telling. I get they do it for the general viewer but they could have done a little more to tie in the photo work or at least tell the viewer what kind of shots they are looking for and how they are going about getting the shot. And they usually only show the actual photos at the end of each episode and it's more of an afterthought. Good series but if you're looking for any insight into the photographer's mind, process, etc. then look elsewhere. BUT if I remember correctly the first 2 seasons were better at working in the photography.

Daniel Mendiola's picture

I feel like even the second season wasn’t about the photography as much as the first

Andrzej Muzaj's picture

I felt like even the first one wasn't. Couldn't force myself to watch anything after first two episodes.

Kyle Medina's picture

I agree with this now that I'm through the first four episodes. It's more of we received this much money from "X" here is our ad story. More than photography. Season 1 was the best.

Rob Davis's picture

I have no interest in listening to photographers talk about *their* journey.

Carlos Santero's picture

I think it is a good thing to sensitize people for nature and what we do to it
Iam not able to see this here in Spain, but I like the Trailers.

Leigh Miller's picture

Really good series...

Also check out "Abstract...the art of design". It's not specifically photo related but I found it such a good blueprint for what photography USED to be like as a career...before we started selling ourselves short.

Tony Tumminello's picture

Also for anyone who hasn't seen Abstract, I recommend doing yourself a favor and skipping the first episode and watching it after you've seen some other ones. It's not all that great and a pretty poor first impression for a series that's otherwise pretty spectacular.

Jason Lorette's picture

This series lost me really quickly...I'm never going on a safari tracking lions through the African wilderness (or I don't expect too), while it was visibly amazing and the story was neat (to a point), essentially doing three seasons of the same thing lost me. Maybe do a season on street photography (different kind of animal) or for that matter any kind...I guess I just didn't expect the photography aspect to take such a back seat.