Photojournalistic

Giving Voice to Black Female Photographers

Giving Voice to Black Female Photographers

It's one thing to be a female and feeling represented in this industry, but it's a whole different thing to be a black female, trying to acquire recognition and voice in photography. How many can you name from the top of your head? For the first time in 30 years, there is a substantial body of work to give an international representation to women of African descent. MFON, "an exclusive and commemorative publication," has collated stories and photographs from over 100 women of African descent, to kick off their first issue, "MFON: Women Photographers of the African Diaspora."

H&M Ad Sparks Ethical Debate in the Industry

H&M Ad Sparks Ethical Debate in the Industry

Social media recently blew up over H&M's controversial hoodie ad, which features a black boy modeling a sweatshirt stating "Coolest monkey in the jungle." Other sweatshirts from the same line, stating "Survival expert," were modeled by white children. Clearly the images of the young models are filled with racist undertones. But is it realistic to think that H&M didn't even think of a possible issue? How does this reflect the photographers who took the image? And why have we yet to learn from our mistakes in the industry?

The Photographer and the Subject: Two Views in Every Photograph

The Photographer and the Subject: Two Views in Every Photograph

As photographers, a common rhetoric we hear is about finding our style. We are to consider so many technical aspects like lighting, lenses, color grading, and choice of palette. On some platforms, these aspects have become more important than the content of the images themselves. However, there are so many other aspects of photography, and every genre of photography has its own set of considerations. In this talk for TEDx Chattanooga, Photojournalist Billy Weeks discusses the role of the photographer in an area of photography that is often thought to be objective in nature.

Is 'Shot in the Dark' Netflix’s Most Tasteless Show of 2017?

Is 'Shot in the Dark' Netflix’s Most Tasteless Show of 2017?

Netflix’s new eight-part documentary “Shot in the Dark” casts focus on three rival Los Angeles-based video journalists as they chase down the “story of the night,” all with the aim to sell their footage to the news outlets for the morning news. But as the city consumes itself through the night, does the slick production fail to address the morality of the journalists altogether in the hunt for a "Grand Theft Auto"-style brand of entertainment?

Adorama Spotlights Pete McBride, the Man Who Hiked 700 Miles Through the Grand Canyon

Adorama Spotlights Pete McBride, the Man Who Hiked 700 Miles Through the Grand Canyon

What started for native Coloradan Pete McBride as an excuse to go off on adventures became a career in photography that would span two decades, 75 countries, and earn him the National Geographic title Adventurer of the Year. In this installment of Adorama TV Spotlight, we learn about the incredible journeys upon which McBride has embarked, and about his passion for documenting and exposing the issues surrounding freshwater.

This Aspiring Actress Got to Photograph Albert Einstein, Then Changed Careers

This Aspiring Actress Got to Photograph Albert Einstein, Then Changed Careers

It was 1948. One aspiring actress tagged along with a couple of filmmaker friends, and ended up taking some of the most iconic photos the world has ever seen: black and white portraits of Albert Einstein. It had such an effect, she instead pursued photography, going on to take portraits of world leaders, and enjoying a career in photojournalism spanning many decades.

Seeing Is Believing: Native America's Dire Need for the Camera

Seeing Is Believing: Native America's Dire Need for the Camera

Over 56 million acres of land in the United States is owned and controlled by approximately 500 Native American tribes that received federal recognition and sovereign land from the U.S. government. Living on this land, although a blessing, has made us invisible to the public eye. In addition to the geographical invisibility, our history, modern culture, and social issues have been swept under the rug for decades by mainstream media and the U.S. government. They typically stay out of the reservations altogether, but unfortunately, people can't fix a problem unless they view it with their own eyes, after all, "seeing is believing." This is the reason our own cameras are crucial to healing our indigenous communities.

Harrowing Footage Shows North Korean Soldier Shot and Rescued During Defection

Harrowing Footage Shows North Korean Soldier Shot and Rescued During Defection

On November 13, a North Korean soldier defected through the demilitarized zone, eventually being shot 5 times by fellow North Korean soldiers before lying about 55 yards over the border, where he was dragged to safety by South Korean sergeants 40 minutes later. This video from the United Nations Command Military Armistice Commission shows the harrowing escape from start to rescue.