Finding Unique Compositions in One of The Most Popular Landscape Photography Destinations

Popular landscape photography locations can be a bit of conundrum in some sense: they're likely popular because they offer great images, but that reputation means it can be difficult to produce original work from them. This vlog follows one photographer as he seeks out those compositions in one of the most popular locations in the world.

Iceland is certainly no stranger to landscape photographers. In particular, you've likely seen Kirkjufell is countless photos. Of course, the frequency of some landscape appearing in photographs doesn't change its inherent beauty, but it does make it harder for your shot of it to stand out. In this video, Andrew Marr heads to the famous location in search of a more unique image than the standard photo you see that frames the mountain on the right and the waterfall on the left. It's an interesting and beneficial exercise, and I really appreciated some of the shots he came away with, particularly since I've seen this landmark thousands of times. 

Hey, speaking of shooting landscapes in Iceland, did you know we have an entire tutorial where we did that? Check out "Photographing The World: Landscape Photography and Post-Processing with Elia Locardi" if you'd like to learn more.

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12 Comments

Mads Peter Iversen's picture

I would hardly say those compositions were unique. They were actually very classic Kirkjufell compositions :)

Same thought, very disappointing...

Michael Holst's picture

I will always be glad to look at photos from Iceland but the place has been shot so much that there really aren't many unique things to shoot there anymore. At least not at the most visited locations. It's still wonderful to see no matter how many times I've seen the same shot. It certainly helps to have been there too.

James Alexander's picture

its mostly because its all been done before and that its so accessible by pretty much anyone, there is still a lot hidden awesome places, they are just harder to get to and require effort and most people don't want to have to do that.

Michael Holst's picture

Even with all of the amazing photographs of the country they never do the real thing justice. The country is very alien from anything I've seen before.

The entire trip I felt like I was on another planet.

Michael Holst's picture

We are all entitled to our opinions I guess. I'd go see it before you knock it though.

Mads Peter Iversen's picture

You shouldn't go Bob if you're not inspired. For me Iceland is the very definition of the cold and rough north, which I love so much. It was my first trip to Iceland that made me go full-in on landscape photography and I've returned several times :)

Michael Holst's picture

Judging a book by its cover are we? I would be willing to bet that almost everyone who goes there will tell you the photos don't do it justice. Much like the Grand Canyon will be better in person.

Have you ever traveled outside of the United States? There's a whole world of beautiful places and people to experience.

Everyone is has different tastes and opinions but why belittle what others see a beautiful and call it a fad? I've never seen such amazing greens vivid greens as when I visited the land of fire and ice. The vast fields of purple wildflowers were also breathtaking. The food was some of the best I've ever had and most of all the people who call Iceland home were the some of the most welcoming and happy people. They love their country and every encounter I had they were excited to let me know where the best hikes and views are.

Some of us can enjoy more than one type of landscape and appreciate unique places for what makes them different.

Michael Holst's picture

opinions are subjective so of course it would be less than objective...

You asked why you'd want to go to Iceland. So I gave you some reasons. Just giving you what you asked for.

Michael Holst's picture

Please look up the meaning of the word subjective.

James Alexander's picture

Was there in May with a buddy and thought the same thing so we found GPS coordinates up the mountains and did a bunch of video shooting at the top.

James Alexander's picture

people mostly don't want to venture more than 100 yards from the parking lot at most locations in Iceland. Its fun to have to work to get the shot, and climbing up the ropes at the top was truly that.