Seven Helpful Tips to Improve Your Landscape Photography

Landscape photography can be a tricky genre, full of subtle aesthetic and technical choices that can really make or break a photo. This excellent video details seven tips that can help you to improve your landscape photos.

Coming to you from Nigel Danson, this helpful video discusses seven tips that can really help you improve your landscape images. Personally, the thing that helped me improve my own work the most was rather simple: slowing down. Landscape photography is a genre where you're generally allowed the luxury of time, and taking advantage of that can be a big step in the right direction, both when you're behind the camera and in front of your computer screen. Simply doing things like double-checking my compositions for things I might have missed and taking time to step away from an edit and come back to it with fresh eyes has made the biggest difference in improving my work, particularly in improving my eye when it comes to subtle edits. Check out the video above for Danson's full thoughts and helpful tips. 

And if you really want to dive into landscape photography, check out "Photographing The World 1: Landscape Photography and Post-Processing with Elia Locardi." 

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4 Comments

ANDREW WILDER's picture

Glad this article was posted, i was hitting a wall with my landacapes.

Thank you. I think Nigel Danson is always well worth watching, and this video is no exception. He wears his learning lightly, offering great advice without sounding pompous.

maurice keith Pennington's picture

Thanks Nigel, very helpful as always. (think your geography is a bit off though - are you sure the harbour isn't Tenby South Wales rather than Cornwall)

John Seigner's picture

Thank you, Nigel, I enjoy your videos (in spite of the language barrier.) I owned a photography business in Banff National Park, in Canada, for 30 years so shot everything from weddings, commercial, tour groups, and as often happens when your vocation becomes your lively hood you tend not to pick up your camera for non-revenue generating pursues like landscapes. Since I'm now retired I have returned to the passion that brought me the Canadian Rockies so many years ago but I'm having to re-teach myself the art of landscape photography given the changes in technology. Your videos have helped me to understand the place of technology and rekindle my passion. Cheers