Hasselblad Launches the CFV-50c CMOS Back for V-System Cameras

Hasselblad Launches the CFV-50c CMOS Back for V-System Cameras

Today, Hasselblad launched the CFV-50c -- a medium format back using the same 50-megapixel CMOS censor in the H5D-50c that can be attached to any existing V-system camera. With no external cables required to connect the backs, the back is incredibly well priced at €11,000. While we're not quite sure what that means for the US market, the new back seems poised to be an incredibly affordable 50MP CMOS medium format system.

Selfishly, perhaps, I'm incredibly happy since I have a V-system (the 203FE) that I use regularly. But for everyone else who doesn't, this still opens new possibilities for the price range. It looks like the 50MP CMOS sensor everyone is raving about in the Pentax 645z and Phase One IQ250 will now be available at a relatively affordable price for those who want to build Hasselblad systems. The Pentax is cheaper to start, but once one adds lenses, the system adds up.

With an easily available V-system camera, one could build a kit with a few lenses for likely quite a bit less than $20,000. Of course, you lose autofocus. And for those used to the square format of the V-system, this is a 645-format sensor. Either way, I'll be looking forward to 65MB, 16-bit RAW files from my 203FE.

Key features of the new CFV-50c:

  • CMOS sensor with ISO values up to 6400 provides lower noise levels, guaranteeing crisp clean images and picture-perfect colours.
  • Long exposures with clean, noise-free images.
  • Simple operation: no external cables required. (The CFV is the only digital back to offer this for V cameras)
  • Live Video in Phocus in colour: Plus much higher frame rate than earlier CCD-based CFV backs.
  • Larger LCD screen with higher resolution.
  • New menu system and button layout.
  • Ninety degree viewfinders. Now photographers can use the PM90 and PME90 viewfinders. (Easier portrait or vertical shooting)
  • 12.5 MPixel JPEG option (in addition to the RAW file).
  • New programmable button - a shortcut to a photographer's most frequently used function.
  • Classic Hasselblad square crop option.
  • Remote control option from Phocus using a 500EL-type or 503CW with winder.

See more about the back on Hasselblad's website, read the full press release here, or see the data sheet for the CFV-50c if you're unsure about compatability.

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10 Comments

Seoirse Brennan's picture

Oh my God that looks sexy.
I want one so much... even just to try. Wow.

Adam Ottke's picture

Me, too... I'm already asking them about it to see about the possibilities. It would be great to get away from spotting film while keeping the same system...

Kristjan Järv's picture

Wow, this is going to be really cheap. You can get a body off of ebay for around 1,500$. I was thinking about getting a Mamiya Leaf Aptus-II with a v-series Hasselblad, but the backs aren't that great. This is going to be amazing!

Jason Peters's picture

Oh yes please, send 2!

Looks interesting. Doubt my clients would notice the difference from the D800 at the sizes they print.
Digital Transitions salespeople were always telling me that I should buy an H system since the old lenses wouldn't have enough resolution. I've never seen proof of this one way or the other. Anyone have a link comparing lens resolution of H and V system lenses?

Jasper Verolme's picture

This is cheep in MF terms.. But did they want it to look so cheep they used a scratched viewfinder on that 503 in there advert? (don't get me wrong i love it.)

Daniele Zedda's picture

I want one so bad!!!!

RUSS T.'s picture

nice

Spy Black's picture

Just when Hassy V lovers thought they could start getting cheap deals on Vs...

Adam Ottke's picture

The interesting part is that Hasselblad already announced the discontinuation of its V line. However, they still seem committed to the millions of people they know have and rely on the V system -- this announcement certainly makes that evident. I'm curious to see how else this might develop in the future (and sad to think how it may not...).