Seven Tips for Getting Better Photos With Your Wide-Angle Lenses

For every tool, or in this case lens, there is often a best case usage. However, breaking the rules and using your lenses in unconventional ways not only makes you a more creative photographer but also more prepared when a shoot or idea doesn't go as planned.

Shooting with wide-angle lenses is my weakness. I almost never use them as a result. I love wide-angle shots but I tend to prefer the compression of stitching multiple shots together from a long lens. That being said when I see an amazing shot done with a wide lens I'm super jealous.

Wide-angle lenses are often most suitable for landscape and architectural photography but with a little practice portraits, product shots, and even sports photos can be achieved. It's all in understanding how a wide angle will affect your subject. Coming from photographer and YouTuber Pierre T. Lambert, his latest video shows you seven tips to getting better photos from your wide-angle lenses. Understanding the effects of distortion, depth of field, and the position of your subject relative to its background you can create unique images that stand apart from what most people are use to seeing. 

As an adventure and outdoor photographer, wide-angle images have become a very popular and trendy establishing shot. So recently I've started playing around with them a little more. What are some of your favorite wide-angle shots? Share them in the comments. 

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7 Comments

I think this guy is drinking too many redbulls

Pierre T. Lambert's picture

My Tea is super strong :-)

Ryan Brenizer's picture

Articles that are just links to videos should be marked as such

So totally agree. 10 minutes is too much time to gamble on a payoff...Images are excellent but I learned nothing.

David Schöppe's picture

They are already marked? There is a little "Play" Symbol up in the left Corner of the Article Image.

Pierre T. Lambert's picture

Hey Michael! Thanks for the write up! :)

I am starting to feel like as soon as I see the word 'Youtuber' it means no credibility. Doesn't mean that the person isn't good at their craft, it just feels like everyone wants to be a YouTuber, but no one leaves a successful career to become a YouTuber, it is usually someone on the fringes of success. People that are the most respected are not youtubers, we know them for their work and not for their drive to get views or subscribers. Before even watching this video I am entering it with cynicism knowing that I am watching a Youtuber.