How To Create a Telephoto Hyperlapse Hand-Held

A hyperlapse can revolutionize a video project, or even become one of its own. However, for the best results, a mechanical slider is usually recommended. In this video, find out how to create a great hyperlapse, hand-held.

If you haven't created a time-lapse or hyperlapse video before, put it high up on your to-do list. It is one of the most satisfying and fascinating ways to use your camera, giving you results your eye could never see without digital aid. The first issue you may run into that could leave you disappointed, however, is a lack of dynamism in the final result. A stationary camera usually leaves the video feeling a little underwhelming and flat, lacking the high-end appeal you've seen others create.

A slider is one way to do this, and achievable without spending a fortune on a mechanical one. There are even ways to fake the smooth movement of a good slider. One method I have rarely seen, if ever, is to use your body and lean on stabilization of the images in post when compiled into a sequence. This not only makes getting a hyperlapse more achievable for many but possible when you're out in the field and didn't expect to need to create any form of time-lapse.

There are a number of technical requirements and a lot of nuance in the creation of a hand-held hyperlapse, so make sure you pay close attention, but give it a go!

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1 Comment

Jørn Tv's picture

Nice video! While it is specifically for hand held shots I really think a monopod makes wonders for hyperlapses. Camera tilting is very much eliminated and for longer shoots you save your arms a lot of work. Raising a big camera with a 70-200mm f2.8 300 times is something you’ll feel. And the time it takes to adjust the monopod is almost as little as hand held.