WhyYouShouldKeepUneditedImagestoYourself
MySimpleApproachToShootingStudioHeadshots
ThreeThingsYou'reDoingWrongWhenRetouching
PhotooftheDay:AbsLove
QuittingYourJobtobeAPhotographerIsn’tanAwfulIdeaIt’sJustNotforEveryone

Branding Yourself as a Photographer: It Doesn't Always Hurt

Branding Yourself as a Photographer: It Doesn't Always Hurt

Branding yourself is probably one of the most important things you can do as a photographer. It is important to showcase your work, whether it is your best work at the time, your best work overall, or even some of the work you just like most. I personally put up the images I think are best, but a lot of the time, I can be very picky, and I tend not to like certain photos when other people still really like them. This is something that is 100% up to you. You are the person choosing what you want to show as a reflection of you and what you do.

Why You Should Keep Unedited Images to Yourself

Why You Should Keep Unedited Images to Yourself

For many of us, photography is a form of art, or at least there is an artistic process behind it. More than that, each of us strive to have a "style" that is an artistic consistency to our work. Photography, however, is quite different from your traditional art-making process. There is as much technical knowledge required as artistic or creative inspiration and thinking. This separates the process into two distinct parts: the shoot and the edit. These two parts are equally important to your identity as a photographer.

Using Subtle Compositing Technique To Enhance A Photo

Using Subtle Compositing Technique To Enhance A Photo

When the term "compositing" comes up, one often considers it a destructive, transformative process that involves frankensteining a myriad of images into a single, completely new, composition. This method can draw as much ire as it does praise. Personally, I love great composites, but many feel that they are too fake. Not all compositing has to be a metamorphosis creating a brand new image, however. By leveraging compositing technique to make slight alterations to your image you can, instead, create a shot that is much more true to reality but still creates a sense of fantasy or surrealism.

Should You Previsualize Your Photography Projects?

Should You Previsualize Your Photography Projects?

You can have the tools, and you can have the know how, but what is one of the most powerful skills that most photographers, videographers, and just about anyone else will swear by in a creative industry? The power of forethought and pre-planning. Granted, for some this step isn’t as important as it is to others. However, whether you sit down and make a shot list, sketch out some rough ideas for shots, or just develop a really strong concept of what you want to accomplish on a project, most people do pre-plan in some way shape or form.

Critique the Community with Mike Kelley - Submit Your Architectural Photos

Critique the Community with Mike Kelley - Submit Your Architectural Photos

The Fstoppers team has been working on a new project with Mike Kelley. While we're with him, we wanted to give some of our readers the chance to have their architectural images critiqued by one of the best in the field. Join us for our next episode of Critique the community by submitting some of your pictures below in the comments. We will be selecting a total of 20 images to give feedback to. See the instructions below to submit your images correctly.

Panic on Set: Does It Help Your Photography and How to Deal With It

Panic on Set: Does It Help Your Photography and How to Deal With It

Photography is one complex profession which requires many skills, from the technical to the psychological. We have all been faced with unpredictable scenarios which have put us or our clients/models in an awkward position ,or a state or panic. It can be anything: an insecure model, no time to set up your planned light, an equipment which breaks or malfunctions, a sudden rainfall, an unhappy bride, etc. Being well-equipped won’t always save the day. And if we lack self-control, good communication skills, and if we lose creative approach in stressful situations, we could just pack our gear and go home with an unhappy client glaring at our back. Being able to deal with these different scenarios might be surprisingly beneficial both for your photography and business.

Two Fun and Funny Filmmaking Canadians Want to Teach You How to Be a Filmmaker

Two Fun and Funny Filmmaking Canadians Want to Teach You How to Be a Filmmaker

Vancouver-based filmmakers, Jason Lucas and Matt Dennison, are all about trying to make quality videos. They're also all about trying to help you make quality videos! In this seven-minute video the IFHT (I Focking Hate That) crew run down 32 steps on, "How To Be A Filmmaker". Even though this is actually a tongue-in-cheek comedic short, rather than educational guidelines, it totally falls in the the realm of, it's-funny-cause-it's-true.

Is This The First Selfie Stick Photograph?

Is This The First Selfie Stick Photograph?

Ah, the selfie stick. And here we were thinking this was a new invention! Taken in 1934, Helmer Larsson and his wife, Naemi Larsson, show true human ingenuity as they pose for a portrait together in Wermland, Sweden, using a literal selfie stick. I think this is the first photograph I've seen where a selfie stick doesn't make the user look like an absolute tool.

Why Competition is Good For You

Why Competition is Good For You

I keep seeing Community Over Competition everywhere. People get upset at another photographer for "stealing" a client or undercutting their prices, and go on tangents about how creating community is more important than competing with one another. While I do agree that community is extremely important, (I mean who else is going to listen to us gripe about the industry and let us bounce ideas off of them?) I also believe that competition is healthy for the industry, and for you.

Pages