10 Reasons Why Wildlife Photographers Are Crazy

10 Reasons Why Wildlife Photographers Are Crazy

Sometimes photography can be difficult, but what keeps us going is our passion for creating images that satisfy something inside us. However, if your passion happens to be wildlife photography, then you have a whole other level of difficulty coming your way. Come to think of it, there are so many valid reasons to abandon this passion and yet, this group of photographers persevere and do it anyway. Here are 10 reasons why wildlife photographers are crazy and why we can’t help but respect their pursuit of happiness.

Fstoppers Reviews the Sigma 24-35mm f/2

Fstoppers Reviews the Sigma 24-35mm f/2

The world's fastest zoom lens for 35mm full frame cameras is the Sigma 24-35mm f/2, and it's one way to follow up from making the world's fastest zoom for APS-C. Sigma has been making hit after hit for a few years now, leaving their "budget" lens brand stigma in the dust behind them. Having a 24-35mm may seem like an odd focal-length range that wouldn't be too useful, but I have found it to be an excellent range for a lot of the work I do in editorial and family portraiture. Let's start with just how it fits in my camera bag.

LA Times Photographer Captures Stunning 8x10 Portraits of US Olympic Athletes

LA Times Photographer Captures Stunning 8x10 Portraits of US Olympic Athletes

In the world of newspaper photographers, you'd be hard to find someone consistently making more exciting and interesting portraits than Jay L. Clendenin. You might have seen his Land Camera Polaroid images from the Toronto International Film Festival, or his 4x5 black and white/digital color diptychs of California Olympians. For this year's Olympics, he decided to go even bigger and bring out his 8x10 Tachihara view camera to capture some amazing photos of American athletes.

Warrior Within: How to Embrace Your Creative Rut

Warrior Within: How to Embrace Your Creative Rut

As artists, we have all been there. The creative rut. The most fatiguing part of being an artist and perhaps the downfall of many talented individuals who could not climb out of it. Creativity comes from many places within us all. However when a photographer's passion is absorbed by the repetition of what we specialize in, the outcome of the work becomes all too grueling to look at. So how do we get back to the love of what we do? How do we fuel once more the passion that showcases our work as new and creative?

Using a Scrim Net to Control Background Brightness

Using a Scrim Net to Control Background Brightness

One of the best ways to achieve a nice soft light on your subjects is to use a scrim. These scrims can range from large reflectors to giant sheets, but they all perform the same task, and that’s diffusing hard light. The problem with scrims is that while diffusing the light, they also lower the power of that light. This loss in power is dependent on the specific scrim you are using and can range from a quarter stop of light all the way to one and a quarter stop of light. The problem with this is that as you lower the light on your subject, while still getting a proper exposure on them, you are in turn raising the exposure of your background. In this video you can see how Joel Grimes uses a scrim net to help control this added brightness to his background.

Mauritian Photographer Shamma Esoof With Her Astonishing, Sad Owl Portraits [Interview]

Mauritian Photographer Shamma Esoof With Her Astonishing, Sad Owl Portraits [Interview]

A couple of years ago, I came across a portrait of a sad owl under the rain on 500px. I couldn’t take my eyes off of it. I never knew there existed such a deep photograph of a non-human creature. I was not the only one thinking so. That picture had won an award and I discovered Shamma Esoof (Sham Jolimie), a person who advocates for animal welfare, social justice, and is passionate about nature conservation. The cherry on top was when I discovered that the author of that unforgettable owl portrait was a mutual friend on social media and was from Mauritius, a country I call my second home after Armenia.

Filmmaker Kevin Smith Demonstrates the Perfect Way to Deal With Criticism

Filmmaker Kevin Smith Demonstrates the Perfect Way to Deal With Criticism
As part of the screening circuit for his new movie releases, filmmaker Kevin Smith typically holds a Q&A session afterwards in which he gets to interact with fans. Any audience member is welcome to stand up to the mic and throw out a question for Smith to answer at length. At a recent Q&A session he got some blunt criticism for his upcoming movie “Yoga Hosers,” but the way he handled it couldn’t have been better. This is something we all could learn from.

Why You Shouldn't Overlook Sound Production in Your Films

Why You Shouldn't Overlook Sound Production in Your Films

Last week, the team over at RocketJump Film School released this awesome video about sound production in film. Sound production is probably the most overlooked aspect of filmmaking, mainly because you don't notice great sound design; it seamlessly helps you submit to the willing suspension of disbelief. Check out RJFS's experiment to see how much sound actually does affect the audience.

Stop Throwing Away Less Than Perfectly Sharp Images

Stop Throwing Away Less Than Perfectly Sharp Images

Image sharpness is, for the most part, a false economy. It is mistakenly believed to be synonymous with image quality; that isn't the case. One major difference is that image quality has a ceiling and once reached (if that's even possible), the image cannot be any better in terms of quality. However, with the sharpness of an image, you can far exceed the perfect amount (again, if there is such a thing), and it begins to cost your image dearly.

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