Voiceover Tips That Can Make or Break Your Video

These voiceover tips are not just for those who record audio, but also for those of you who direct interviews and commercial videos where your talent has to talk with confidence and the right intonation.

If you have worked on company presentation videos or you have captured yourself talking in front of the camera, you know it's not as easy as just pressing the red button and recording. If there's a lack of interest or engagement with the content being spoken, it is greatly multiplied through our recording devices. The final video is often judged by the impact of the sound of the voice.

In this series of tips, The Basic Filmmaker does not merely tell you that audio and technically well-recorded sound is important. He dives much deeper, discussing the importance of the intonation and voicing of words, expressions, and sentences; what happens when there are mistakes during the recording; where to stop and where to start over; and many more. You will most probably use these tips at your next corporate interview where you can direct the person speaking so you have the best possible audio and video materials for post-production.

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4 Comments

Ryan Mense's picture

This video is super solid. Not sure if I've seen this guy before. Good find!

Tihomir Lazarov's picture

Thanks.

Yes, lots of gems in there.

Spy Black's picture

"You will most probably use these tips at your next corporate interview where you can direct the person speaking so you have the best possible audio and video materials for post-production."

...as best one can, I suppose. It's one thing if you're the guy doing the voice-over, as he was. It's another thing to get a non-pro to record well, especially if they're a bit spooked by recording gear.

Tihomir Lazarov's picture

The trick is to let them see they're a part of the team. Then they get used to the gear and working with them gets more smooth. Most of the advices (if not all) the author of this video tells are applicable for the non-pros too. Just with a little bit more patience, as you have said.