Nature

A Trip to the Woods: Wildlife and Bird Photography With the Sony a9 Mirrorless Camera

A Trip to the Woods: Wildlife and Bird Photography With the Sony a9 Mirrorless Camera

Since the new Sony a9 announcement and subsequent release, it’s been earmarked as an honest competitor to the sports and wildlife scene. As time went on we saw a lot of talk about it being framed in the context of sports photography, so I eagerly wanted to take it out and see what it had to offer to the wildlife and bird photographers who were often getting left out of these discussions. Here’s a collection of my thoughts after heading out into the woods with the Sony a9.

Stunning Time-Lapse Featuring the Most Extreme Weather Phenomena of the American Midwest

Stunning Time-Lapse Featuring the Most Extreme Weather Phenomena of the American Midwest

Mike Olbinski, an award-winning photographer, did it again. Here is his latest production, a stunning time-lapse showing some of the most powerful thunderstorms, supercell structures, and tornadoes of the American Midwest. Olbinski specializes on storm chasing but this season was particularly tough for him. Mother Nature has not been cooperative this year despite his extensive weather forecast knowledge. The storm chaser had to drive 27,000 miles across 10 states during a month to capture the 90,000 frames necessary to finish the project. Hence, he called this video “Pursuit.”

A Photographer's Guide to Exploring Tasmania's Wilderness

A Photographer's Guide to Exploring Tasmania's Wilderness

For the last 10 years I have been regularly visiting this remote and pristine island state. Tasmania is about a 1.5 hour flight from Sydney to the city of Launceston. The diverse choice of landscapes and close proximity by car make this a unique and accessible environment still largely untouched. Around 40 percent of Tasmania is protected National Parks and Reserves. If you are looking to get off the grid and discover a magical wilderness, this place is filled with adventure and convict history. Here are some of my favorite spots to photograph in spring or autumn. I have also added a few other locations as side trips that are also worth a look.

Landscape Photography is Not So Bad: You Will Not Fail

Landscape Photography is Not So Bad: You Will Not Fail

The largest single landscape print I have made to date is a ten-foot-wide panorama of the Painted Rock at Fort Irwin. Titled A Thousand Words Fall Short, I donated it to a Veterans' clinic on the 4th of July. Printed on Fuji-crystal archival paper, front-mounted to 1/4" museum acrylic with an anti-glare coating, and backed by a solid sheet of aluminum, it really caught and exalted the light in the humble hallway where I was honored to see it hanging a couple days ago.

Behind the Scenes of Nat Geo's ‘The Last Honey Hunter’

Behind the Scenes of Nat Geo's ‘The Last Honey Hunter’

It takes skill and experience to create compelling documentary films, and just one facet of that process is capturing the footage. Traditional films are usually shot on the ground, perhaps on a tripod or some other mount, and there are plenty of challenges inherent to that process. But have you ever tried to capture footage while hanging from a rope and getting swarmed by Himalayan honey bees? And you thought your job was tough.

Consistency in a Photo Series: Why It's Important

Consistency in a Photo Series: Why It's Important

Just recently after moving back home for the summer, I decided to begin a new aerial series. Up here in Bergen County, New Jersey, there is not much to shoot, or at least that is something I tell myself. One day after skimming Google Maps for spots to fly, I came upon a few islands on a lake, each with their own individual house. Intrigued by what I saw, I knew that I had to find a way to capture these homes in a way that makes them more interesting to me. So right here, my series began and I will explain why I think it is important to keep every photo consistent.

Yes, You'll Need Those Crazy Glasses to Shoot the Upcoming Solar Eclipse

Yes, You'll Need Those Crazy Glasses to Shoot the Upcoming Solar Eclipse

The first solar eclipse in almost a century will be visible across the entire United States on August 21 this year. That means if you’re looking to catch a photograph of it, it’s time to gear up. When I was a younger (read: greener) photographer, my first instinct would be to point the camera at the sun and let it rip. That’s a really bad idea. You’ll want to prepare both your own eyes and your camera to shoot this rare event properly.

How Hiking Has Shaped My Photography

How Hiking Has Shaped My Photography

Unlike most people in Photography, I didn’t pick up a camera for the love of making art. I never thought of myself as an artistic person but I wanted something better than my phone to document my hikes in the Appalachian Mountains. Quickly after getting my first Sony a6000 just like with all my hobbies I had to know everything about it and so I ran down the photography rabbit hole (and haven’t come back). Even though I do more with my camera nowadays than just documenting the trail, it has taught me a few things that have helped me immensely in my work.

How BBC Films Animals At Night

How BBC Films Animals At Night

The animal kingdom does most of its activities at dawn or at dusk, and many only hunt when they can hide in the darkness that the nighttime brings. This video showcases how BBC went about capturing the animals using artificial light at first, and how they do it now using infra-red and thermal cameras.

25-Year-Old Photographer Goes on the Hunt for the Perfect Wild Bison Picture

25-Year-Old Photographer Goes on the Hunt for the Perfect Wild Bison Picture

The beauty of animal and nature photography has nothing to envy to other genres. The work and patience that goes into creating one single frame are astonishing and sometimes, all the time and efforts don’t even result in a picture. In this video, Michel D'Oultremont describes how he ended up shooting animals and also what he feels when doing what he loves most. No matter if you love animal photography or not, this 10-minute-long documentary is one to watch!

Capturing Elusive Animals With Camera Trap Wildlife Photography

Capturing Elusive Animals With Camera Trap Wildlife Photography

As the number of people interested in wildlife photography continues to grow, and the capabilities of modern equipment expand the boundaries of what is possible, many of us are seeking new ways to produce work that is fresh. This has meant exploring new techniques and searching for untapped frontiers in wildlife photography. This trend has led to a rapid increase the number of people interested in using camera traps.