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Action Scene From 'Everest' Without Sound Effects Reminds Us of the Importance of Great Sound

Action Scene From 'Everest' Without Sound Effects Reminds Us of the Importance of Great Sound

While the original source couldn't be independently confirmed, the studio behind the recently released movie, "Everest," apparently sent BBC a clip of the still unreleased film without audio effects. Instead, throughout the entire otherwise hair-raising scene, the actors speak to each other in a tone seemingly more appropriate for a focus group discussion between amateurs trying to solve a Rubik's cube than for a life-threatening situation climbing Mount Everest.

Did You Photograph the Rare Supermoon Lunar Eclipse? Here Are Some of the Best Shots from Social Media

Did You Photograph the Rare Supermoon Lunar Eclipse? Here Are Some of the Best Shots from Social Media

Sometime around 3 a.m. this morning, I awoke to a strong light beaming through my bedroom window. It was the supermoon glowing big and bright. I crawled out of bed, grabbed my camera gear, and set up a tripod on my tiny patio in Amsterdam to shoot the famous supermoon lunar eclipse — that phenomenon that happens only a few times each century.

Film and Photoshop: The Story of a $900,000 Stock Photo

Film and Photoshop: The Story of a $900,000 Stock Photo

It's a photo so ubiquitous that if you type "iceberg photo" into Google, it's the first two image results. And the sixth. And the tenth. Ralph Clevenger's iconic photo of an iceberg's tip peeking out from the water while the substantial body of it remains below has graced countless publications, from full-page magazine advertisements commissioned by major corporations to the ever-famous "Imagination" motivational poster. It's a photo that is so famous that it's been copied, stolen, manipulated, parodied, and imitated an innumerable number of times over its nearly twenty-year existence. It's even made rounds on the internet as a hoax that Snopes picked up.

Life on the Road: The Realities of Traveling While Working as a Filmmaker and Photographer

Life on the Road: The Realities of Traveling While Working as a Filmmaker and Photographer

In the last few weeks I interviewed both the Wickstrom’s and the Hage’s, creative couples who make their living while traveling full time. In this article, I’ll be sharing what I’ve learned from spending two months on the road with my partner, while trying to stay on top of projects and work on new ones. Come to find out, it is not as fun and dreamy as it sounds.

Insane Close Up Photo of Lightning Strike in Texas

Insane Close Up Photo of Lightning Strike in Texas

Here in 2015, everyone and their grandmother has a smartphone with a camera. Subsequently, almost every interesting second of life on Earth is, for the most part, captured digitally on said devices, or so it would seem. Every now and then, it takes more than dumb luck to catch a one-in-a-million snap of something seldom seen close up. In the case of professional stormchaser Hank Schyma, this lightning strike near downtown Houston was a project 20 years in the making.

Life on the Road: DesignEgg's Andy Wickstrom on Photography, Business, and Travel

Life on the Road: DesignEgg's Andy Wickstrom on Photography, Business, and Travel

Many of us dream about the idea of traveling, and using our skills as photographers, filmmakers, or designers to sustain a lifestyle that allows us to travel and work at the same time. Guys like Elia Locardi come to mind, but his methods are just one of many different ways to make a nomadic working lifestyle a sustainable one, and in this article I’ll tell you the story behind Wickstrom Design.

HAZMAT Surfing Video Predicts a Dangerous Future for Our Oceans

HAZMAT Surfing Video Predicts a Dangerous Future for Our Oceans

Earlier in the week, we shared Michael Dyrlands, HAZMAT Surfing photo series. To recap, HAZMAT Surfing is a photo series that gives a futuristic look at what surfing could be like twenty to twenty-five years down the road and spreads awareness of our oceans contamination. Dyrland came up with the idea after he was unable to enter the water on a trip to LA because of ten billion gallons of run off that had polluted the ocean after an evening of heavy rain. Dyrland has now released a video version of HAZMAT Surfing, which continues to spread awareness of the contamination of our oceans.

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