Studio

What You Need to Start Your Own Photography Studio

What You Need to Start Your Own Photography Studio

When many of us first entered into the realm of photography, most of us had the same question: What gear should I get? What do I need? Jay P. Morgan from The Slanted Lens helped out many with those questions back in 2015, but the video is a bit dated now. With the questions coming back for today’s market, Morgan decided to make an updated video with his suggestions to start your studio in 2017.

Tether Tools T Setup and Aero Traveler Fstoppers Review

Tether Tools T Setup and Aero Traveler Fstoppers Review

There are many instances where I’m working on site and I need to adjust camera position while on a tripod. From interiors and architecture, food and product photography, often a tripod alone can’t provide the convenience or flexibility I need to get a job done quickly. In other situations where space is limited, my gear needs to occupy as small of a footprint as possible while shooting tethered. That’s where the Tether Tools T Setup and Tether Table Aero Traveler comes in.

Create Your Photographic Lighting Style by Understanding Six Qualities of Light

Create Your Photographic Lighting Style by Understanding Six Qualities of Light

Wouldn’t it be great to be able to walk into almost any photographic situation armed with a whole vocabulary of lighting techniques and be able to quickly select exactly the type of lighting you want for the main light of your photo? By understanding six key qualities of light you can create your own vocabulary of lighting to draw upon and apply for your desired effect in fashion photos, formal, and lifestyle portraits and beyond. Angle, Size, Distance, Shape, Duration, and Color are each qualities of light that photographers can combine and manipulate these qualities in setting the look of their photograph for impact beyond just illumination.

Learn Virtually Every Lighting Setup You’ve Ever Imagined For Free

Learn Virtually Every Lighting Setup You’ve Ever Imagined For Free

If you’ve ever wanted to see how the pros light amazing studio shots, look no further. My wife and I recently moved into a new place that offers quite a bit of new space for studio style photography. Being a tad rusty I was excited about the plethora of shooting opportunities a controlled lighting space would offer, but found myself lacking motivation. Until I discovered Broncolor’s “How To” section on their website.

Peter Hurley Explains How the Inverse Square Law Applies to Photography

Peter Hurley Explains How the Inverse Square Law Applies to Photography

The inverse square law is one of the most important yet misunderstood concepts in photography. On the surface, it basically says that the intensity of a light source will decrease as you move the light away from your subject, but how does that apply to the highlights and shadows in a portrait? In this small excerpt from the "Illuminating the Face" tutorial, Peter Hurley breaks down both the math and the practical application of the inverse square law.

Four Light Setup Using Only Grids for Studio Portrait Photographers

Four Light Setup Using Only Grids for Studio Portrait Photographers

Grids are probably amongst the best pieces of equipment a photographer using flash can own. Alas, they are often either underrated or misunderstood. On one of my recent shoots, I decided to create a lighting setup with grids on every single strobe. My goal was to create a somewhat complex setup, that once broken down step by step would be easy to recreate by any photographer starting out in studio photography.

Why Every Photographer Should Own a Light Meter

Why Every Photographer Should Own a Light Meter

While it certainly wasn't my first time using one, a recent shoot I did for TEDx at the Ohio State University made me realize how much easier life is with a light meter. For almost all the time I've spent behind cameras, I've been creating portraits. And for most of that time, I've been using flash. Starting out, I would just shoot and tweak power settings and my aperture and the light placement until I got what I wanted. As an amateur, it worked. But once I decided that photography was a career for me and as I began picking up client work, this method became quite ineffective, forcing me to get the one tool I never realized I needed.

The Bug-Out Bag: Items You Shouldn't Go to a Shoot Without

The Bug-Out Bag: Items You Shouldn't Go to a Shoot Without

For the majority of my life, I was a soldier in the United States Army. As a part of military life, I learned how valuable it was to be prepared for all the things that could go wrong. Many soldiers will build a bug-out bag, also known as a go-bag. A bug-out bag is essentially a bag full of items one might need when in a pinch. Now as a photographer, my bug-out bag is full of all the little items I often am asked if I have or things that can make any shoot go easier. These things have often meant the difference between success and failure on a shoot. Here is the list of stuff I put in my bag.

BTS: Combining Strobe and Continuous Lighting for a Dancer Studio Portrait

BTS: Combining Strobe and Continuous Lighting for a Dancer Studio Portrait

If you're not a professional photographer, chances are that you may be under the impression that they do little more than take pictures all day, every day. While we definitely know that's not the case — I'm probably only actually shooting for around 20 percent of my work week, and running a business for the other 80 percent — that's not what I wanted to portray when I got asked to be "job shadowed" by an eighth grade girl a while back. I decided to make the day at least a little more interesting.

Fstoppers Reviews the Elinchrom 17" Softlite Reflector and Grid Set

Fstoppers Reviews the Elinchrom 17" Softlite Reflector and Grid Set

I am a photographer who started shooting with daylight only, and I moved to discover new possibilities of lighting only after mastering daylight and craving more tools to create the desired images in my head. I don't believe the idea that you have to have all the possible equipment to be a good photographer or that the equipment makes you the photographer. My credo was always to master what you have available and only afterwards move to a new tool. This way, you can have all the understanding of your tools and avoid a bulk of unnecessary equipment.

Critique the Community: Submit Your Best Editorial and Fashion Images Now

Critique the Community: Submit Your Best Editorial and Fashion Images Now

Fstoppers is happy to announce the next round of Critique the Community. We invite everyone to submit your best editorial and fashion images to be critiqued by Clay Cook. Please follow the guidelines for submissions below to ensure eligibility for your image to be chosen. We will be accepting submissions through Friday night, November 18 and will be offering feedback to a total of 20 pictures.