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Wouter du Toit
Paris, FR

Articles written by Wouter du Toit

The Best Thing You Can Do for Your Next Idea Is Space Out

When was the last time you stood in a queue or sat on the bus and not taken out your phone to flip down your social feeds, be it Instagram, Snapchat, or Facebook? And, if you can't remember or think about a certain time the past year, you need to think about consciously setting up a stage or time of your day where you actually do nothing, and get bored. Why? Because your best ideas come from your mind being free and unfocused, where it can run off to new areas of thought and consciousness and potentially release a new idea or concept for your next shoot or project. This video explains it in more detail. Pay attention to better not pay attention.

YouTube Is Tuning into 'Stories' and They're Calling Them 'Reels'

I had the feeling they would do it. When I saw Instagram take it from Snap, and then use it for Whatsapp and Facebook too, it became tangible, something you could take and use if you have a platform with creators who make content as a career path. YouTube is giving creators the ability to create "reels," their name for what Instagram calls "stories." It won't appear on top of the app window at first, but they told TechCrunch that if it takes off they'll consider moving it to a more hands-on part of the app.

Casey Neistat Reviews the Rylo 360-Degree Camera

Casey Neistat's latest vlog is a review of the Rylo 360-degree camera. What makes this different than the 360-degree cameras currently on the market is that it comes with software that makes it easy to pick your shot (in other words, the frame that'll fit your 16:9 or 4:3 frame) and compose your video like that. Rylo is a start up, and although Neistat can distinguish which market it is for, I think it definitely can become something many videographers, especially YouTubers, and travel shooters will use.

A Short Film Made With Cinemagraphs

Eric Flores Garnelo has made a short film using mainly cinemagraphs to create the scenes. The audio is well produced, and the production of the scenes are done with craftsmanship. Watching each of these shots with only one item moving opens up the capacity to contemplate. Being a photographer, the first phase was to think how he did it and what it must have taken to actually get the shot. Secondly, it takes you deeper, into the human condition and the small moments during the day that can seem insignificant, but holds so much beauty if we just opened our eyes.

Adobe Bringing Us a Super Update

It's something every single person using Photoshop today has battled with, and although it has become easier to use over the years, it's time-consuming, tedious, and often difficult to do well depending on the image you're working on. Making selections is the tool we use to isolate certain parts of the image. To either reuse or edit in a different fashion to the rest of the image. Using machine learning, an update coming to Photoshop makes it possible to click and select. That's right, no more pen tool, or magnetic lasso tool or the selection of the negative space to feather and smooth the selection. This video shows how it will work, and in my opinion, it can't come soon enough.

Fstoppers Review the Capture Pro Clip From Peak Design

Just like motor vehicles have critical parts that are crucial to the safety and functioning of the vehicle, so too do photographers have gear that they need to work every time to get the shots they desire. It’s what makes you able to get the shots you want and it also gives you your unique style which translates into your photography and work. Second to that, you get the items that change and improve your process of making images. And with the style of photography I pursue, often straight from my bike, the Capture Pro Clip is one of those game-changers.

A Breakdown of VFX on 'Mindhunter' TV Series

"Mindhunter" is one of the recent Netflix releases that has me hooked. It has psychology, mystery, analysis, and how the FBI and police went about training for the serial killers who didn't have a motive. It's based on true events, and because the series is set in in 1977, which has different cars and fewer people and buildings than we have now. In this video, you'll be able to see how these shots were altered in postproduction to give the story the 1977 setting. Buildings and trees are added, marks on roads replaced and colors changed to give the series its moody, raw film look.

AmnesiArt Uses the iPhone X to Shoot a World-Renowned Chef Profile

If you've seen our latest comparison between the iPhone X and the Panasonic GH5, you see that the iPhone suits the run-and-gun type of shooter who makes videos on the go where you want the gear to get out of the way with a small and light form factor. In this video, the team at AmnesiArt made a professional video for Elise Lepinteur, the protegee of Christopher Adam, a worldwide famous pastry chef based in Paris, France.

Trying Something New: Shooting Without Autofocus

I recently got myself the Fujifilm X-T20 for traveling. The next trip was to Vietnam with my family and I knew it was going to be a showcase of people, culture, and life that I am unfamiliar with, and therefore something I wanted to document. The reason I chose the X-T20 was that it’s small, light, packs a punch with colors, and its ease of use, very reminiscent of the film cameras back in the days. What I didn’t get was a Fuji X-mount lens to go with it, but I got a Fotasy adapter to fit my old Nikkor 50mm f/1.4, my Vivitar 28mm f/2.5, and Tamron 80mm-210mm f/3.8-4 to the X-T20.

Five Tips to Speed Up Your Editing Workflow

Every video project is different. You can have a client looking over your shoulder at every instance, or you can have a client not giving you any direction of what they want, which leads to multiple re-edits to produce a video they like and need. This means that where you can save time, you should. And one of the areas you can cut down is to know your NLE (non-linear editing system) and optimize it to suit you and the project you are busy with. In this video, Pond5 shows how you can streamline your editing and speed up your workflow.

Albert Watson Shares How He Shot the Famous Steve Jobs Portrait

I often wish I could’ve been a fly on the wall when directors like Steven Spielberg pitched "Back to the Future," or when Ridley Scott said he wanted to direct "Blade Runner." It’s just a super way to see how the masters get the go-ahead from the producers. Often it’s just your personality that resonates with the person, or perhaps you have a great skill that people know you for. The portrait of Steve Jobs that was used for the cover of his biography as well as for the Apple website from the day he died was taken by Albert Watson. In this video, he gives us an idea of what it was like to shoot one if the world’s most well-known tech leaders.

Cloak Is Where Video Footage Is Going, and It's Amazing

Photo editing, retouching, and removing something from the shot isn't easy to do especially if it's a complex part of the hair, but it's common practice for a professional photographer to be able to do it if the shot and client requires it. It involves masking the new hair refining tool brush over and selecting the best feathering to make this selection as true as possible. Have you ever thought about removing something from a video? This is what Adobe is working on and this video shows a sneak peek of what Cloak will be able to do.

Plug In Your Robotic Arm

We love gear. But this is next level stuff. If you’ve seen the smoothness of the shots used to introduce the Microsoft Studio Surface, you’ll know what I’m talking about. The guys at Motorized Precision who introduced KIRA robotic arm at NAB 2017 are taking pre-orders for the MIA, their latest robotic arm. It’s smaller, about as portable as a fridge is on wheels, and can plug into any traditional single phase wall socket. It holds up to a 22lb camera package, the arm itself weighs 120lbs and it comes with a standard six-meter track. If you want to see what it's capable of go watch Thor: Ragnarok, which used the KIRA for many of their shots. The video shows what the KIRA 1.0 could do.

'How to Be Creative: How an Artist Turns Pro': Inspiring Video for All Creatives

Have you ever heard of the poem by Charles Bukowski that questions what it means to be a creative, and how to answer to that calling you have within? Are we supposed to listen to Bukowski’s poem when we consider becoming a photographer or taking our photography pro? This video starts off with the poem. Bukowski was a writer, but the insight can be applied to all creative professions. Have you ever had a day where you just had no creative voice within you? It’s happened to me, and after this video, I don’t feel so bad about it. No one can be switched “on” al the time. We need to let the creative juices come as they want to.

'Automatica':  Man and Machine Make Music Together

Instead of fearing the future where AI takes over and leaves us with nothing else to do other than oiling their machines, Nigel Standford made a music video and used this "man against machine" concept. It's a DJ, who also plays guitar. The machines take over. Who's making the music? If I had to take it one step further, was the camera filming on an electronic camera rig or was it held and controlled by a DOP?

Mistakes You Can Avoid Starting Out as a Video Editor

Many photographers I know have started making videos as well. It's a skill many clients and brands are looking for. Social networks have been developing the easiest way to watch a video on their platforms and if you look at the amount of time you spend browsing online, video takes a large percentage of that media you consume. If you want to start with video and don't want to make mistakes that can waste time or have you look like someone starting out, here is a video that lists the mistakes and how to prevent them so you are off to a good start.

Take Your Filmmaking to the Next Level

There are many ways to go about your video. You can just go at it, shoot away, and edit quick shots together, or you can think about what you want to shoot and use psychological composition to bring your story across in the best way possible. You can have progression of your hero moving from left to right throughout the film, or you can keep your villain to the left and your hero to the right to have them compete in your viewer’s mind. This video shares some smart ways to approach your next film or photography project, even if your project isn’t narrative based.

How ‘The Handmaid's Tale’ Uses Shallow Focus for Storytelling

Shallow focus was the go-to for us all when we first got our DSLRs that could shoot video. It looked so beautiful, and to a certain degree, it even looked professional. For a while. It was overused, and at some point, if your video consisted of only shallow focus, it was the determining factor to show whether you were a pro DSLR filmmaker or an amateur. But, it certainly has it's place, and the Nerdwriter shares how and why “The Handmaid's Tale” used it in this video.