Animal

How a National Park Changed the Way I Shoot: Lessons From Yellowstone (Part 1)

It's been several years since I first had the chance to visit Yellowstone National Park, but I can honestly say that it was an incredible experience throughout and I can't wait to go back. The trip to the national park was honestly a game-changing experience for me and how I approach my own landscape photography. I learned so much on that trip, not necessarily about my gear, but about what to shoot and how to capture it in a way that would help me really remember what it was like to see things in person.

Breathtaking Hunt for the Perfect Polar Bear Photography in Arctic

Photographing wild animals in their natural environment is very rewarding and one of the most beautiful experiences that a nature photographer can live. Actually, that most photographers could live. Being face to face with a polar bear with nothing but a camera in between is both extraordinarily breathtaking and scary. Wild nature photographer Joshua Holko, filmmaker Abraham Joffe, and cinematographer Dom West went to the Arctic and documented this experience so that we could try to relive it with them.

A Trip to the Woods: Wildlife and Bird Photography With the Sony a9 Mirrorless Camera

Since the new Sony a9 announcement and subsequent release, it’s been earmarked as an honest competitor to the sports and wildlife scene. As time went on we saw a lot of talk about it being framed in the context of sports photography, so I eagerly wanted to take it out and see what it had to offer to the wildlife and bird photographers who were often getting left out of these discussions. Here’s a collection of my thoughts after heading out into the woods with the Sony a9.

Advice for Working With Animals on Set

Photographing kids can sometimes be difficult, and even some adults can present challenges during a photoshoot. Shooting animals can present similar challenges along with whole new ones you may not have thought of before. Whether or not the animal is professionally trained to be in front of the camera, you need to be prepared.

vizsla chasing ball at beach

When it comes to photographing animals, one of the most technically difficult images to capture is the running action shot. This style of photography often captures the most comical expressions, and is a necessary skill for artists who specialize in photographing dogs. Choosing the appropriate lens, camera settings, and lighting environment will ensure that you will be able to consistently nail your action images time after time.

english bulldog standing on beach at sunset

One of the main reasons why I love photographing dogs outdoors is the challenge of creating beautiful backdrops from the natural surroundings. One of my favorite ways to photograph dogs on location is to use a wide-angle lens to allow the sky to be the dominant background feature. When photographing dogs during the golden hour, incorporating a single speedlight or strobe in your outdoor dog portraits will allow you to effectively use the sun as a backlight and create eye-catching compositions at sunset.

Why Use a Drone When You Have a Seagull?

I’m sure you’ve seen it time and time again on YouTube; animal encounters captured on a GoPro. These popular little action cameras have seen it all. Watch a kayak fisherman fight off an aggressive hammerhead shark. Check out this shot of a red fox carrying off and attempting to eat a GoPro. Take a look at what it would be like to be stalked and chased by a marlin in the open ocean. And good luck sleeping after you feel what it would be like to stroll into a rattlesnake pit.

Smart Campaign of an Animal Shelter Speaks for Itself

Visual imagery, when used properly, can become one of the most powerful tools of making an impact around any disturbing topic. The recent campaign for an animal shelter World for All in India is a bright example of it. Photos of puppies and kittens might work, but I am inspired by how the creative team took this campaign beyond what we see on a regular basis. Optical illusion, more precisely figure–ground reversal, is used intentionally to create new visual images with the play of foreground and background within an existing image.