BTS

Peter McKinnon's First Video of 2018 Sets the Tone for Success in the New Year

Peter McKinnon's First Video of 2018 Sets the Tone for Success in the New Year

It's 2018. A brand new page. For us creatives, renewed energy, and enthusiastic drive is what it will take to kick the new year off right. And who better to personify said energy than coffee fueled, Toronto-based photographer / cinematographer Peter Mckinnon? In his first "vlogtorial" style video of 2018 Mckinnon takes to the streets of Toronto with friend and sage-like video creator Chris Hau.

How to Film Yourself Peter McKinnon Style

How to Film Yourself Peter McKinnon Style

Under mounting pressure from my peers and the industry at large, I finally tried getting into video creation. While filming myself in my first video ever (an unboxing), I ran into a whole slew of issues. How should I mount my camera? Where do I place it? Why does this look so gosh diddly darn boring? To say I struggled would be an understatement. To say I gave up would be spot on. But maybe it was for the best, because two days later, Toronto-based Photographer and Cinematographer Peter McKinnon came out with all the answers to my problems — well, my technical and inspirational ones. The rest I'm still working on.

Faking High-Speed Movement From a Robotic Camera Arm With Simple Tools

Faking High-Speed Movement From a Robotic Camera Arm With Simple Tools

The "bullet time" effect keeps evolving and today it can be achieved not only with an array of digital cameras, but with high-speed robots equipped with high-speed cameras. We, the lower budget society, always try to get the latest visual techniques in our work, but, if possible, on the cheap. This video will help you imitate a high-speed camera movement with simple tools you may already have in your video production workflow.

Five Things I Learned From Photographing My First Weddings

Five Things I Learned From Photographing My First Weddings

For the longest time, I avoided shooting weddings at all costs. I personally thought they were something photographers only did to make money and that no one truly enjoyed them. But as I developed more and more as a professional I started getting the itch to just try one, just to say I could do it. Soon after, I got in touch with my contact that worked weddings and lined up a job as a secondary shooter the following week. When it was all said and done, those four hours were possibly the most fun and challenging times I’ve ever had with a camera.

Make the Photo You Dream of With Preparation and Patience

Make the Photo You Dream of With Preparation and Patience

Growing up along the coast, I became accustomed to beautiful views of the ocean and, of course, lighthouses are an important part of the New England scenery. One lighthouse, in particular, has long been a favorite subject of mine to shoot. I've spent many days and nights shooting the 67-foot-high structure and its surrounding area, and I always envisioned creating the classic image of a massive moon as it rises behind an interesting foreground structure — in this case, the Point Judith Lighthouse on the southern tip of Rhode Island.

Step Out of Your Comfort Zone With a Long Lens

Step Out of Your Comfort Zone With a Long Lens

As someone who shoots 90 percent of my professional work with wide lenses, it seems like a daunting tasking to go reaching for a 70-200mm or longer when looking to capture a landscape. Long lenses require a lot more thought in how the compression is going to affect the way the viewer sees the image and its a focal length that the human eye can’t really grasp until you look through the viewfinder. With that being said, learning to use these long focal lengths will go a long way in making us more versatile in our craft. Lucky for us, Thomas Heaton has decided to make a video specifically about this.