Portraits

How to Clean Skin Using the Clone Stamp Tool to Retain a Natural Look

How to Clean Skin Using the Clone Stamp Tool to Retain a Natural Look

Cleaning skin is one of the most tedious tasks there is when it comes to portrait retouching. It takes quite a bit of time, and when done improperly, the texture can quickly become mushy. To keep the final image as natural looking as possible, there are a couple of techniques that can be used to limit the number of pixels we alter. In this tutorial, Zoë Noble demonstrates how she uses the clone stamp tool to clean the skin.

Photographer Uses a Tiny Caravan as a Mobile Dark Room to Produce Stunning Images

wet plate collodian technique. monochrome photographs. old fashioned photos.

In this video produced by The Guardian, Australian Photographer Adrian Cook shows a reporter how he utilizes a mobile darkroom to produce striking images using the Collodion Wet Plate Process. It’s a short video but it has a wonderful tempo to it, mimicking the excitement one might feel when creating an image using this technique. It starts off slow and thoughtful, but the music builds towards an exciting crescendo while the plate is sensitized and exposed, then settles again as the plate is bathed, magically revealing the beautifully toned scene superimposed on the aluminum sheet.

Photographing Infants and Toddlers: Working With Short Attention Spans

Photographing Infants and Toddlers: Working With Short Attention Spans

Some time earlier this year, I had this idea to try and find my own approach to portraiture solely for children. It was a multi-faceted idea which came to me pretty much at random. I was reviewing some of my recent portrait work when I realized that I had only ever worked with a couple of children as my subjects throughout my entire running career as a photographer. I figured out a long time ago that family portraits really just weren't something I was interested in, but that didn't really have anything to do with my actual choice of subjects. Just because I didn't want to shoot family portraits didn't necessarily mean that I couldn't work with kids.

How to Control Your Portrait Backgrounds With a 70-200mm Telephoto Lens

How to Control Your Portrait Backgrounds With a 70-200mm Telephoto Lens

No matter if you photograph headshots, weddings, portraits, or sports, one of the most important skills you can have as a photographer is picking out interesting yet non-distracting backgrounds. Many photographers prefer shooting with fast prime lenses but in today's short photography tutorial, I'm going to show you why I prefer the power and versatility of a telephoto lens.

Creating a Thin Beam of Light With Off-Camera Flash

Creating a Thin Beam of Light With Off-Camera Flash

Light is a key factor in photography. It helps shape and create your photo. As the sun changes throughout the day, depending on where you are you may see some thin beams of light fall across the environment. Creating these thin light beams and adding them to your portraits can add some interesting looks. Controlling the light into small beams is one way to create drama and mood in your work. How would you create a thin beam of light on set?

Do You Prefer a Prime or Zoom Lens for Portraiture?

Do You Prefer a Prime or Zoom Lens for Portraiture?

Traditional advice says that prime lenses are best for portraiture for many reasons, particularly a wider aperture and better sharpness. Nonetheless, modern zoom lenses can offer very high image quality coupled with increased flexibility, and that can cause some photographers to reach for them before a prime lens when doing portrait work. This video explores one photographer's experience with both.