My Favorite Black and White Conversion Method in Photoshop

My Favorite Black and White Conversion Method in Photoshop

Black and white photography may well be the ultimate classical expression of the art form, after all it is how photography started. It's still a continually popular aesthetic, even now well into the digital age. However, black and white images, in my opinion, should be simply more than the removal of color. Thankfully many thousands of photographers and designers agree with that, and the usage of black and white conversion methods and approaches is prevalent in the post production world.

Hitting a Wall With Your Photography? How to Defeat Creative Burnout

Hitting a Wall With Your Photography? How to Defeat Creative Burnout

Do you feel at a certain point, after making a long run of photoshoots, that you're hitting a wall with your creative side? Or have you "lost your touch" so to speak? This is also known as "Creative Burnout." As creatives, we've all been there before. At one point we all plateau and need to find a way to break the "funk" to get back of the swing of things. So how do we overcome this?

Is This Photo Fair Marketing Or A Cheap Trick?

Is This Photo Fair Marketing Or A Cheap Trick?

In a quaint suburban neighborhood south of Sydney, Australia stands a three bedroom brick home that looks like any other at first glance. It is sharp and modern. The image is bright and vibrant and definitely eye catching. At a quick first look, it is a pretty standard image of the facade of a home. The detail that isn't featured in this image is what has the entire real estate industry buzzing. A simple Google search of the home brings up a much different representation of the property. Which begs the immediate question; how far is 'too far' when using photo editing software to edit real estate imagery?

For Better or Worse: This Year's Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue Steps Into Virtual Reality

For Better or Worse: This Year's Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue Steps Into Virtual Reality

For an instant, she stares blankly out into the distance as she would for any photograph. But almost immediately, she takes notice. You're there. She turns her head, looks over, and then slowly turns back, looking down at her outstretched legs. Her eyes move slowly, looking down, as her chin lifts her gaze from the top of her legs to her feet. She's admiring herself — for you. She even starts crawling toward you. You turn your head to look around ("Toward me?," you think, but no one else is there). You turn back to her. The clip is over. You can take off your Google Cardboard viewer and go back to flipping channels on your living room TV.

Photographing Hong Kong With Elia Locardi / Behind The Scenes Episode 13 and 14

Photographing Hong Kong With Elia Locardi / Behind The Scenes Episode 13 and 14

Our second tutorial with Elia Locardi: Photographing the World: Cityscape, Astrophotography, and Advanced Post-Processing was all about different types of cities. We started in Cinque Terre, a region of Italy where cities are basically built into the side of a natural landscape. We then moved on to Rome to shoot ancient architecture. Next we moved on to Singapore and Hong Kong for something a little bit more modern.

Fstoppers Interviews Photographer Victoria Will, Creator of Captivating 'Moving Portraits'

Fstoppers Interviews Photographer Victoria Will, Creator of Captivating 'Moving Portraits'

Even if you've never heard of Victoria Will, you probably have seen her awesome moving portraits of celebrities. These captivating images give a new take on celebrity portraits. Some might say they are simply amazing, but others might give a different opinion. We sat down with Victoria to give you this exclusive interview and discussed the inspiration behind these images.

Critique the Community Episode 17: Sports Photography

Critique the Community Episode 17: Sports Photography

Last week, we asked the Fstoppers Community to submit their best sports images to be critiqued by the Fstoppers team. We had a fantastic variety of images to choose from with over 250 entries. To keep in theme with this episode, we decided to film it during a recent ski trip. Lee and Patrick gave feedback to twenty images chosen from the submissions. Check out the selections and add your feedback and thoughts to the comments.

Your Photo and Video Work is a Representation of Yourself, Not Your Client’s Budget

Your Photo and Video Work is a Representation of Yourself, Not Your Client’s Budget

Are you proud of every commercial photo or corporate video production you’ve done? Have you ever found yourself explaining to someone, maybe even a client, about how a project you worked on could have been better, but you were held back by the lack of a big budget? That’s understandable to a point, but I think there has to be a certain standard of quality with any production, regardless of budget.

Adobe CC Bug Erases Data on Macs (UPDATED)

Adobe CC Bug Erases Data on Macs (UPDATED)

A bug in a recent Adobe Creative Cloud update is currently deleting a folder on the root drive (Macintosh HD, by default) of Macs upon installation. This issue is affecting Backblaze users disproportionately due to the fact that the bug results in the deletion of the contents of the alphabetically first hidden folder on the root drive, which is often the folder ".bzbol" for Backblaze users.

Video Shows 28 Historical Clips of New York City

Video Shows 28 Historical Clips of New York City

We get so caught up in the latest and greatest gear that it's often easy to forget that video and photography offer us a powerful window into past times. YouTube Channel Yestervid has put together a compilation of historical footage of New York City, shot between 1896 and 1905, and paired the individual clips with a map of their modern day location. It's a great tour through one of the nation's most storied cities.

Street Photography: Wandering While Observing Both City and Society

Street Photography: Wandering While Observing Both City and Society

Some of my best street photography was shot while wandering the city with no apparent aim. Street photography is a genre in which you have little to no control of what your subject does, the light you’re working with, or the setting. You cannot force anything, and you cannot stage life in the streets or predict what’s about to happen before your very eyes. You’re just there, observant and ready to shoot. Here’s how I do it.

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